May 17, 2022

The Westfield Voice

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Microsoft: the offender of the month

3 min read

It seems as though the world of mobile electronics is at the end of its rope and more confused then ever on what consumers want or need. Microsoft—the biggest offender—Apple, and Google have not been acting as though they are experts in their field anymore with their latest round of announcements and product launches.

To start, let’s talk about one of the moderate offenders: Apple. Apple has recently announced the launching of the iPhone SE and the iPad pro.

It seems as though Apple is trying to combat their critics who are claiming the company no longer has the ability to “wow us” anymore. In an interesting move the SE is using their flagship design of the 5s and packing in the content and state-of-the-art technology of the iPhone 6.

Claiming to be the “most powerful four-inch phone” ever, the SE will be just that. The SE will have a 64-bit A9 chip, an M9 motion coprocessor, and an NFC chip with supportfor the popular Apple Pay. All these updates will give the SE roughly three-times the power of the 5s and will also allow for the “Hey Siri” feature that allows for a hands-free experience, or so Apple claims. There are some drawbacks: the SE will not have the 3D touch feature that gave the 6s users the ability to use functions based on the amount of pressure they use on their screens and will only have a 1.2 megapixel user-facing camera.

The iPad Pro will have two models: a 9.7 inch and a 12.9 inch display screens with the 9.7 display having a lot of the same components as the latest iPhones but a far superior CPU. Though the 9.7 display is no bigger than their Air 2, the 12.7 display doesn’t come with a lot of the fine-tuned components.

Now, let me talk about Microsoft: the offender of the month. Microsoft has found multiple ways to screw over its fan base for years, and for me this is the final straw.

Despite promising a long list of Windows 8.1 cellphones that would be eligible to update to Windows 10, Microsoft has released it only to avery select few of their Lumia phones.

Now, given the age of some of their models, it’s not a surprise that a lot of phones can’t update to the new OS, but with no second wave of updates happening, a lot of Windows fans are upset.

HTC promised back in 2015 that the M8, their flagship model, would be eligible for the update, and they would support it for two years, the average time a person has a phone; however, HTC has gone back on its promise and now says there are no plans for the device.

For a lot of people—myself included—these broken promises are not only sad but also hurtful. Windows mobile already has no claim to a half decent app store;it shouldn’t even be uttered in the same sentence as the Google and Apple stores. Most of their popular apps are 3rd party developers who just hack into the Apple and Google servers to use popular apps like Snapchat and free navigation apps.

To put it into a more relatable perspective, the Instagram app is still in its BETA form and hasn’t been updated in over a year while Waze, the popular navigation app, has noted it will not update its Windows version since its last update.

Private developers are not the only ones abandoning the 8.1 platform apps: Microsoft has, too. Microsoft has not updated any of their own apps like Xbox music (which was renamed Groove months ago but not updated on phones) and instead will focus on “single platform apps” for Windows 10. Many Android users are used to the kind of treatment from Google where OS updates are by phone model and not by individual update, but at least their apps still work.

Microsoft has lost all of its credibility to deliver on its promises, and its pitiful mobile platform should be put down. For all intents and purposes, we might as well buy a tablet than a Windows phone at this point.

Next week, there will be more in-depth look at the differences between Apple and Google, and maybe an answer to the question: Who has a better phone?

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